Samurai Warriors 5 (PC) Review

It's you vs. the world, and the world doesn't stand a chance.


In fighting games, you typically fight someone one-on-one. In shooters, you typically fight a team. But in the genre of musou, you're expected to fight thousands - all at once. Popularized (and trademarked) by the Dynasty Warriors franchise, publisher Koei Tecmo housed this franchise, as well as the Samurai Warriors franchise, for going on its third decade. It's seen spinoffs incorporating franchises like Zelda and Gundam, proving ultimately most popular in the East, but still having a market in the West. The Samurai Warriors franchise has reached its fifth entry, and is looking to keep the genre relevant after all these years.

Samurai Warriors 5 PC Review Horse Oda Nobunaga Art
The presentation of Samurai Warriors 5 is pristine - gorgeous watercolored backdrops accompany in-game cutscenes with emphatic voice acting.

Plot

The storytelling within Samurai Warriors 5 is stellar, and will be a great time for those compelled by the feudal history and warring culture of 15th Century Japan. There are plenty of cutscenes that extend to several minutes to give the player a good idea of each character's personality - there's no shortage of characters, as you'll encounter several named allies and foes on each March. While the main character is presented with plenty of options on how to move forward, though, there's zero input from the player - a disappointment, as branching paths would make a lot of sense in several situations. Nevertheless, as tedious as the gameplay may be, at least there's ample story to back it up.

Samurai Warriors 5 PC Review Horse Musou Combat 1v100
In this photo: tons of bodies strewn about, a 326 combo, and a tutorial. Par for the course for a musou!

Gameplay

It's time to break down how Samurai Warriors 5 and musou's in general play: it's you vs. the world, and the world doesn't stand a chance. One look across the battlefield and you'll see dozens or even hundreds of enemies at any given point. Consider yourself a god amongst men, as your battle-trained enemies will perish in one or two hits as you carve a path to your next commander. Even then, these baddies will succumb to well-placed combos as you juggle and stun-lock them into submission. It's an irrefutable fact that no game genre will make you feel more powerful than a musou.


So, having the power to crush everything in your path with little to no resistance - how does that pan out? Well, to some, it's welcome to feel fully in-control and to let off steam, but with no challenge means a fraction of the reward of falling an enemy in any other game. As such, I had to play Samurai Warriors 5 in bursts, as it almost felt like a chore navigating a large battlefield with nothing standing in my way. It didn't help that the convoluted menus with tons of systems and no depth felt like more work than it was worth.

Samurai Warriors 5 PC Review Horse
You'll be seeing your equine a lot to expedite moving from point A to B.

Visuals

The visuals of Samurai Warriors 5 are a mixed bag. While the gameplay/combat is as smooth as silk, the graphics were sacrificed to make that happen. Cel-shaded/muddy characters aren't anything to write home about, but I did enjoy seeing a wealth of expression and emotion in their faces during cutscenes. All things considered, I'd prefer the game not experiencing any slowdowns or stutters like it does now than it being too graphically-intensive to run well.


Audio

The sounds of Samurai Warriors 5 fare better than its visuals. Sword slashes are succinct, characters are voice-acted by experts, and the music is appropriate for the time period involved. Whatever weapon you have equipped, you can expect a mighty whack, thomp, thud, etc. to follow after your swing. Characters will laugh, shout, cry, and groan with some oomph to their performance. I usually put my own music over action games, but opted not to with the fitting soundtrack to the battles. This is an area where the game shines.

So, why should you play it?

  • You want to devastate hundreds of enemies on-screen (with little/no fear of failure) after a long day.

  • You're compelled by feudal Japan and love a good storyline.

  • You're already familiar with the musou genre and have been waiting seven years for a new Samurai Warriors title.

But why shouldn't you play it?

  • You want any semblance of a challenge in your video game.

  • You get bored of always having the upper hand.

  • You don't have a controller - it's troublesome on mouse/keyboard.

A press copy of Samurai Warriors 5 was provided courtesy of the publisher.

Written by

Mike Reitemeier


Mike is a game reviewer, columnist, and writes articles for several music publications. He enjoys running meme pages, gaming, and thrifting. You can read more of his reviews and retrospective articles at qualbert.com